Posted by: Lauren Talley | June 17, 2009

Contributors

hardworkingcoffeehouse_00962

Adriene Hill: Adriene is Chicago Public Radio’s business and economy reporter.

Sara Sargent: After receiving her master’s from the Medill School of Journalism in December, Sara began interning at Chicago Public Radio. With a background in business and economics reporting, she assists Adriene on the Hard Working series.

Lauren Talley: Lauren comes to Chicago from Michigan, where she’s familiar with the local effects of the recession. After a semester in Valencia, Spain, Lauren returns to the Midwest to assist Adriene on the Hard Working series. She studies journalism and Spanish at Michigan State University.

Mary Gustafson: Mary is alarmed to find herself newly without a job in an industry facing a bit of an identity crisis. With her journalism brethren dropping like flies at daily newspapers, alternative weeklies, consumer magazines and trade magazines (from which she formerly hails), she remains optimistic that the perfect job is still out there. And, depending on the cover letter she’s writing, she is either “at heart a print journalism girl” or “an early convert to digital journalism.” Truthfully, she couldn’t live without either. In the meantime, she takes some comfort in blogging her misadventures on her blog entitled My Year Of Living Dangerously.

M Hunter: M is a techie trapped in the body of a creative. Originally a West Coaster, he came to Chicago for school, met the girl of his dreams, and hasn’t managed to leave yet. With almost 10 years of experience in IT, he was unexpectedly laid off by one of Chicago’s premier media properties. Now he, along with his wife, try to navigate unemployment, keep the marriage together and keep their senses of humor through it all.

Eddie Lakin: A culinary school graduate, chef, and restaurant manager with more than 15 years of restaurant industry experience, Eddie’s work experience also includes two years in Spain and Italy. With a resume that includes scooping Beluga caviar at Tru, rolling maki at Roy’s Chicago, and slinging hash browns and over easy eggs at Uncommon Ground, Eddie brings a wealth of culinary knowledge and real-world experience to his current kitchen gig–cooking at home for his wife and two young children after being laid off in October of ‘08. He blogs at Cooking and Eating in Chicago and writes for web-based food and wine magazine Off the Vine.

Erica Lipper: Erica recently moved to Chicago and was promptly laid off! She holds an MA in English literature from Georgetown University and has worked as a teacher and writer.

Reid McCamish: A social science researcher by day, this Chicagoan fancies himself an artist, musician, futurist and firebrand philosopher. Reid is planning to write about viewing work as a choice instead of an obligation and about employment negotiations. “I mean to talk about how most employment negotiations, especially job interviews are conducted as if the employee/job seeker has no negotiation power, essentially as if they’re begging for a job, when I’m reality, they’re negotiating the sale of a valuable commodity – their time or labor – that they have control of.”

Nia Williams: With degrees in anthropology and journalism, Nia is torn between two loves: Media and academia. She has spent nearly the entirety of her 10-year career with one foot in each world, hobbying one when the other pays the bills. Until January she was a media professional, watching nervously as her industry hemorrhaged thousands of jobs due to a worsening economy. Now she’s a job-seeker eyeing that bloodbath from the sidelines, trying to land a new gig before severance from the old one runs out. She’ll be writing about unemployment from the young single’s perspective–job-hunting, spending, and living when there’s no other income to rely on. She blogs about frugal-yuppie living at dollar out of 15 cents, and writes a budget decorating column for the Chicago edition of Examiner.com.

These days, people are cutting costs wherever and however they can. But we at Hard Working want you to know that aiming to eat inexpensively doesn’t mean sacrificing the best parts of cooking, namely taste and fun. In that spirit, each week we will feature a recipe from one of our fellow recession-minded chefs–colleagues, family members, blog contributors–that costs under $10. And as always, we welcome any suggestions you, our readers, might have (so feel free to submit your own recipes!).

Explore inexpensive recipes from our contributors:

April 20: Dieting in downtimes

This post features recommendations on how to lose weight in a recession

April 15: Banana bread bombshell

This post features 1 recipe courtesy of the Food Network: Banana Bread

April 13: Put down the bottled dressing and step away from the salad

This post features 3 salad dressing recipes courtesy of Heidi Swanson, Everyday Food and Sara Sargent: Ginger Dressing; Mighty Miso Dressing; Citrus Honeybutter Dressing

April 8: An eggplant in every pot

This post features 1 recipe from Sara Sargent: Cheesy Veggie Mania Pasta

April 6: Shopping in bulk

This post features 2 recipes courtesy of Real Simple and Food & Wine: Spinach Pesto and Pasta; Baked Tomato Risotto

April 1: Cans and boxes to the rescue

This post features 1 recipe from Adriene Hill: Easy Homemade Tomato Sauce

March 30: 1 crust goes a long way

This post features 2 recipes from undergraduate Rebecca Commito who is studying abroad in France: Carrot Quiche; Chicken with Vegetables, Covered in Crust

March 25: Quick bites

This post features 4 recipes from California resident Waverly Lutz: Almost Apple Pie; Grains, Greens, Beans; Coconut Yam Soup; Nachos are for Artichoke Lovers

March 23: Chili for rainy days

This post features 1 recipe from Adriene’s sister, Alison: Chipotle Turkey Chili

March 18: Price-conscious parm

The post features 1 recipe from Chicagoan Cara Tigue: Eggplant and/or Zucchini Parmesan

March 16: Fake it ’til you bake it: Ditch expensive meat, not taste

This post features 2 recipes from Minneapolis chef Joe Lieberman: Vegetarian Risotto and Cold Asian Noodles with Tofu

March 9: Our blog launches a new weekly recipe feature

This post feature 3 recipes from the founder of The Chopping Block, Shelley Young: Homemade Whole Wheat Pizza with Caramelized Onions, Pears and Blue Cheese; Chicken Pan Roast with Artichokes and Peas; Grilled Skirt Steak with Balsamic Glaze and Warm Couscous and Raisin Salad

Helpful sites for cheap eats:

Cheap Cooking: According to its founder, Ellen, Cheap Cooking is designed to provide information and resources for people needing—or wanting—to cut back on expenses. After scouring bookstores, garage sales and libraries for information, Ellen is well equipped to provide readers with recipes and tips.

Better Budgeting: This site is ideal for families who want help with every aspect of cooking: recipes, meal planning, budgeting. Browse breakfast, lunch and dinner ideas to find out how to be frugal at every meal.

Rebecca’s Pocket: This blog got started when creator Rebecca made it her goal to feed herself and her partner for one month on a “Thrifty Food Plan” budget cooking with organic food. Her budget is $74.00/week or $320.80/month, the USDA “Thrifty” standard for a family of 2 adults, aged 20-50 years. Read about what she buys, what she eats, what it costs and how she manages to do it.

Frugal Recipes: Brimming with cooking tips and 11 recipe categories, Frugal aims to be a one-stop shop for your recession cooking needs.

The Culinary Review: TCR is a food and cooking resource focused on the cost and calories of food and recipes. Through its database of food costs, density conversions and calories, the writers translate common recipes, as well as those from famous TV chefs, and provide clear-cut information such as total cost, cost per serving, total calorie content and calories per serving.

The Paupered Chef: Launched in 2006, this tongue-in-cheek blog from Nick Kindelsperger (who lives in Chicago) and Blake Royer (who lives in Estonia) features a wide variety of food-related topics, from cheese-making to curing pig jowls in the living room, to the perfect technique for cooking hambugers. Their motto: “No project is too absurd or misguided.”

To answer your questions about recession-related topics, Hard Working’s Q&A feature gets answers from business and economics experts. If you have suggestions for a Q&A, please contact us!

4/17 — Helping your family deal with the recession

Family Credit Management President Michael McAuliffe on ways to get your family through the downturn

4/10 — Unemployed and navigating a new job market

YWCA Associate Director Cynthia Anglin on how to reenter the job market

4/3 — Farewell, faux pas! Be your best employable self.

Staffing expert Taz Wilson on improving resumes and cover letters

3/27 — Career ch-ch-changes

National Career Development Association President Judith Hoppin on changing careers

3/20 — Get in touch with your inner Mommy on a Shoestring

Glenview mom Beth Engelman on cheap activities to do with your kids

3/13 — Be true to your school: The career office is there for a reason

University of Chicago career advisor Marthe Druska on job searching

3/11 — Freeze, fry, repeat: How to cook through the recession

The Chopping Block founder Shelley Young on frugal cooking

3/6 — COBRA Confusion? Your questions answered

The Horton Insurance Group’s Fred Garfield on new COBRA benefits

2/5 — Questions about internships? The Intern Queen has answers

Intern Queen Lauren Berger on securing internships

This is a compilation of Job Fairs and hiring events (some are free, others charge a fee) we’ve found on-line. Please double check the accuracy of the information about any event before you show up. And, if you’d like us to post your event, let us know.

May

http://www.chicagojobresource.com/chicago_job_fairs_may.htm

June

June 22: Chicago Tribune Career Fair, Schaumburg, IL

July

August

September

Sept 22: NAACP Professional and Executive Diversity Job Fair, 10:00am – 3:00pm, Navy Pier, Chicago, IL 60611

October

November

December

Unemployment Data

The National Bureau of Labor Statistics releases weekly national data on unemployment, employment, earnings and other labor market topics by demographic characteristics.

Chicago Workforce Center Services

Chicago’s five Workforce Centers and more than 30 community-based affiliate organizations offer a range of services to help Chicagoans find and keep jobs.

Illinois workNet Centers

Illinois workNet Centers are one-stop service centers with staff committed to supporting and developing the workforce in their community. Illinois workNet Centers help individuals find the services they need, and help employers meet their human resource requirements.

Heartland Alliance Mid-America Institute on Poverty

The Heartland Alliance Mid-America Institute on Poverty has compiled a Quick Resource Guide for Illinois families struggling to make ends meet. The Quick Resource Guide outlines the various types of assistance that may be available to Illinois families and includes information on eligibility criteria, where to get more information, and how to access or apply for certain benefits.

Employment Services for Ex-Offenders

The City of Chicago is committed to helping ex-offenders reenter the workforce and this web site is an excellent resource. It provides a list of employers that have experience working with ex-offenders in programs offering job readiness training and skill development alongside support services that help individuals achieve self-sufficiency.

Senior Community Service Employment Program

The Senior Community Service Employment Program, sponsored by the Illinois Department on Aging, is a training program designed to assist workers 55 years and older in re-entering the job market. The training program places eligible individuals, usually for 20 hours a week at minimum wages, in nonprofit agencies or community service agencies community assignments.

Job Training at YWCA

The YWCA’s new Economic Empowerment Institute offers women a partnership for long-term personal and financial success. With the help of a professional empowerment coach, women will set personal goals and a plan to achieve them over three program phases.

Improve Your Tech Skills at YWCA

The YWCA Community Technology Center (CTC) enhances participants’ employment opportunities through computer training. Classes teach computer fundamentals, including Internet navigation, web design, e-mail communication, desktop publishing, spreadsheet processing and word processing.

YMCA Workforce Development

The YMCA Alliance prides itself on preparing Chicagoans for economic independence by providing educational, entrepreneurial and workforce training and support. The YMCA offers GED preparation classes, vocational training, career planning and job placement assistance.

Job Training at the Chinese American Service League

Services at CASL include: the Community Employment Program, which helps with interview techniques and provides employment counseling; the Community Technology Center, where people can access job information online and prepare materials; and the Chef Training Program, a 16-week course that trains students in continental cuisine and places graduates at Chicago restaurants, hotels and catering services.

Illinois Department of Employment Security

Check out IDES’s Web site to find out about services such as resume and job-hunting workshops, online unemployment filing, tax filing, access to PCs and fax machines, and much more.

Illinois Department of Labor

Contact the IDL with concerns about the enforcement of employment laws, safety regulations and Freedom of Information Act requests.

Indiana Department of Labor

If you have questions about minimum wage, child labor laws, safe works environments or other concerns affecting your employment, use the IDL Web site to submit your queries.

Indiana Department of Workforce Development

According to their mission statement, the IDWD implements employment programs, manages unemployment insurance systems and facilitates local economic growth initiatives.

Has the economy got you thinking that it’s time to create your own business? Why not tackle the global financial crisis head-on and become an entrepreneur? If you want to know more about where to start and what resources are available, this event is for you.

Come to our community-building conversation hosted by the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum and WBEZ business and economy reporter Adriene Hill. We’ll talk with experts about how and where fledgling businesses can get help and what the federal stimulus plan means for aspiring entrepreneurs.
Wednesday, June 24

3-3:30pm: Conversation
3:30-5pm: Browse resource tables and network

Jane Addams Hull-House Museum
Residents’ Dining Hall
800 S. Halsted
Chicago, IL

Due to space limitations, reservations are strongly recommended. Please call 312.413.5353.

Light refreshments will be provided.

Hard Working is an interactive series from WBEZ about jobs and joblessness. Using the radio, the Internet, and face-to-face conversations, WBEZ will start and encourage conversations about work and unemployment. WBEZ will follow job seekers through the ins and outs of the job hunt, find out who’s hiring and who’s firing, and talk about what “work” means to you and to people around the region. You can find out more by visiting www.chicagopublicradio.org/hardworking.

Contributors

hardworkingcoffeehouse_00962

Adriene Hill: Adriene is Chicago Public Radio’s business and economy reporter.

Sara Sargent: After receiving her master’s from the Medill School of Journalism in December, Sara began interning at Chicago Public Radio. With a background in business and economics reporting, she assists Adriene on the Hard Working series.

______________________________________________________

Mary Gustafson: Mary is alarmed to find herself newly without a job in an industry facing a bit of an identity crisis. With her journalism brethren dropping like flies at daily newspapers, alternative weeklies, consumer magazines and trade magazines (from which she formerly hails), she remains optimistic that the perfect job is still out there. And, depending on the cover letter she’s writing, she is either “at heart a print journalism girl” or “an early convert to digital journalism.” Truthfully, she couldn’t live without either. In the meantime, she takes some comfort in blogging her misadventures on her blog entitled “My Year Of Living Dangerously.”

M Hunter: M is a techie trapped in the body of a creative. Originally a West Coaster, he came to chicago for school, met the girl of his dreams, and hasn’t managed to leave yet. With almost ten years of experience in IT, he was unexpectedly laid off by one of Chicago’s premier media properties. Now he, along with his wife, try to navigate unemployment, keep the marriage together, and keep their senses of humor through it all.

Eddie Lakin: A culinary school graduate, chef, and restaurant manager with more than 15 years of restaurant industry experience, Eddie’s work experience also includes two years spent in Spain and Italy. With a resume that includes scooping Beluga caviar at Tru, rolling maki at Roy’s Chicago, and slinging hash browns and over easy eggs at Uncommon Ground, Eddie brings a wealth of culinary knowledge and real-world experience to his current kitchen gig–cooking at home for his wife and two young children after being laid off in October of ‘08. He blogs at Cooking and Eating in Chicago and writes for web-based food and wine magazine Off the Vine.

Erica Lipper: Erica recently moved to Chicago and was promptly laid off! She holds an MA in English literature from Georgetown University and has worked as a teacher and writer.

Reid McCamish: A social science researcher by day, by day this Chicagoan fancies himself an artist, musician, futurist and firebrand philosopher.” Reid is planning to write about viewing work as a choice instead of an obligation and about employment negotiations. “I mean to talk about how most employment negotiations, especially job interviews are conducted as if the employee/job seeker has no negotiation power, essentially as if they’re begging for a job, when I’m reality, they’re negotiating the sale of a valuable commodity – their time or labor – that they have control of.

Nia Williams: With degrees in anthropology and journalism, Nia is torn between two loves: media and academia. She has spent nearly the entirety of her ten-year career with one foot in each world, hobbying one when the other pays the bills. Until January she was a media professional, watching nervously as her industry hemorrhaged thousands of jobs due to a worsening economy. Now she’s a job-seeker eyeing that bloodbath from the sidelines, trying to land a new gig before severance from the old one runs out. She’ll be writing about unemployment from the young single’s perspective–job-hunting, spending, and living when there’s no other income to rely on. She blogs about frugal-yuppie living at dollar out of 15 cents, and writes a budget decorating column for the Chicago edition of Examiner.com.

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